The Psychology of Color

According to marketing psychology, colors have a definite, positive impact on the purchase intention of a consumer.
This effect can be observed when specific stimuli are provided, such as creating a shopping environment that
uses specific color wavelengths. When certain motivational states are activated as a result of being exposed to these colors, in turn, people’s performances in different cognitive domains improve. The colors of the visible spectrum have specific effects on the human psyche and give rise to very different sensations:

Color Spectrum Graphic

COLORS ARE LINKED TO:

PINK

Nurturing
Warm
Soft

PURPLE

Luxury
Authenticity
Quality

BLUE

Competence
Intelligence
Communication
Trust
Eciency
Duty
Logic
Security

GREEN

Outdoors
Nature
Earthy

YELLOW

Optimism
Happiness
Cheerfulness

ORANGE

Lively
Energetic
Extroverted

RED

Arousing
Exciting
Activity
Strength
Stimulation

BROWN

Seriousness
Reliability
Support
Ruggedness

BLACK

Sophistication
Glamour
Stateliness
Dignity

WHITE

Balance
Calm
Neutral

THE EFFECT OF BLUE VS. RED IN RETAIL

BLUE

QUALITIES

• Increases purchase intention of hedonic
products (those leading to emotional gratification, such as Nutella®)
Ambient: + 40.9%
Display: +105.2%
• Enhances performance on creative tasks
• Improves cognitive performance and well-being
• Causes negative mood in older people
• Activates a lower level of arousal
(responsiveness to stimuli)

PLEASANT SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT

OUTDATED MERCHANDISE ENVIRONMENT

EXPENSIVE MERCHANDISE PRICE

RED

QUALITIES

• Garners attention
• Evokes passion and love
• Increases blood pressure and appetite,
and is linked with metabolism
• Causes negative mood in younger people
• Activates a higher level of arousal
(responsiveness to stimuli)
• Leads to compulsive shopping

UNPLEASANT SHOPPING ENVIRONMENT

UP TO DATE MERCHANDISE ENVIRONMENT

INEXPENSIVE MERCHANDISE PRICE

Researchers found that a particular tint of blue light (identified by an emission spectrum centered at 460 nm–“actinic blue”) enhanced purchase interest of hedonic products (e.g., Nutella®, Ray-ban® sunglasses, Swatch® watches), but not utilitarian products (e.g., Johnson’s® Baby Shampoo).

Sources: Eects of blue lighting in ambient and mobile settings on the intention to buy hedonic and utilitarian products (G. Guido, L. Piper, M.L. Prete, A. Mileti, C. M. Trisolini) Psychology & Marketing, 2017, 34:2, 215–226. Are men seduced by red? The eect of red versus black prices on price perceptions (n. M. Puccinelli, R. Chandrashekaran, D. Grewal, R. Suri) Journal of Retailing, 2013, 89:2, 115–125. Exciting red and competent blue: The importance of color in marketing (l. I. Labrecque, g. R. Milne) Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 2012, 40, 711–727.

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Tom Foerstel : Founder & President

Tom Foerstel

Founder & President

Growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area in the 60’s, Tom developed a strong desire to create positive change for people and planet.

 

He went on to pursue his passion for art and design at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and worked for design firms in Southern California before moving to Boise, Idaho in the early 80’s. Foerstel Design opened its doors in 1985. Since its inception, the firm has cultivated a bold, happy, forward-looking team focussed on creating distinct and effective work on behalf of their clients.

 

An integral part of Tom’s philosophy is giving back to the community in which he lives — a company cornerstone that drives Foerstel’s long history of providing pro-bono services to local non-profit humanitarian and arts programs.

 

One of Tom’s proudest personal achievements is his ability to say Supercalifragilisticexpyalidocious backwards.